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This is my playground for poetry written for children with ideas and inspiration for writing your own poems. Come on in. Sit for a spell, have a cup of words to swirl around and make your own cup of poetry. I'm so glad you are here. I hope you'll find the Kingdom of Poetry a fun place to be.

Friday, February 6, 2015

HAPPY POETRY FRIDAY

   The weather in Tucson has been quite delightful.  Yesterday we were at 80 degrees and it is supposed to be that warm again today.  It is quite spring like here,  so I've written half a dozen spring haiku for today.

Searching for good luck
my friends and I try to find
a four leaf clover.

A red lady bug
wiggles and tickles my arm
she's climbing higher.

Spring rains bring puddles.
I wear my new rubber boots,
will they get dirty?

Time to go shopping.
We are looking at the mall
for Easter dresses.

With our roller skates
we cruise the old neighborhood
while watching for cracks.

A happy May Day
I wear ribbons in my hair
to dance the May Pole.



   I have been reading picture books written in haiku lately and several use the American traditional haiku of 5-7-5.  Five syllables in the first line, seven in the second, and five syllables in the last line.  This is all fine, but I've also noticed some awkward line breaks in some of the haiku to keep to the syllabics.  Ending a line on an article, a preposition or a conjunction makes for a VERY weak line. 
   So here is your poetry challenge for today, try writing your own haiku about what the weather is like where you are.  Try to keep to the 5-7-5 syllable scheme and DO NOT end a line with an article, a preposition or a conjunction.  If you'd like to share your haiku, please leave it in the comments.  Due to COPPA laws, if you are under 13 years of age, please have a teacher or parent leave your comment.
   The Poetry Friday Round Up is being hosted by  Elizabeth Steinglass today.  You'll find more poetry at her blog here.   Thanks for a great party. 

15 comments:

  1. Thanks for the tips on how to make haikus stronger.

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    1. Linda, this doesn't apply only to haiku--it applies to ALL poetry. Poetry is all about the line. It is what differentiates it from prose. There I go getting on my high horse again. I really hate seeing poorly written lines when just a little tweaking will fix the problem.

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  2. Looks spring-y over here with the sunshine, but it's quite chilly today! Your poems do remind us spring is on the way. I enjoy "freeing" students from the 5-7-5 rule, since it doesn't really correspond to Japanese syllable counting anyway, and that helps with avoiding those forced awkward line endings you mentioned!
    - happy writing, in any weather.

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    1. I'm with you, Robyn. I agree, but when a poet publishes picture books using the 5-7-5 and then uses weak lines, I think it is a disservice to kids and teachers who are looking for examples of haiku.

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  3. Just reading these spring-y poems warmed me up -- and made me a teensy bit jealous of your weather. :) I think the lady bug haiku is my favorite.

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    1. Thanks Jama for reminding me (just by your being here) I didn't include a food (taste) haiku.
      Dying Easter eggs
      then we get to hunt for them--
      too many to eat.

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  4. These remind me so much of Guyku by Bob Raczka. Do you know that book? Yes, the ladybug is my favorite too.

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    1. Yes, Liz, I know the book.

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    2. Liz, do you think I could call mine Girl-ku?

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  5. Joy, it is fun reading your spring haikus when it is so cold here on Long Island tonight. I am wondering if you have any winter haikus for the Winter Whisperings Gallery. I am looking for someone in a warm weather climate to give me their perspective of winter as it appears in their local.

    I will try to meet your challenge when I have a moment. Thanks.

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    1. Thanks, Carol. I'm glad you decided to accept the challenge. I'll contact you about Winter Whisperings Gallery.

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  6. How refreshing these are! Puts me in the mood for a bike ride, actually. Can't think of an appropriate haiku on the spot, but I'll keep working on it. Thanks for the inspiration. :)

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    1. I wish we could bike ride together. There are some great bike paths in Tucson one of the most bike friendly cities in the US.

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  7. I'm all about the free form haiku, Joy. We sure are lucky here in AZ to have the winters we do, but then again, we pay in summer. =)

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    1. You betcha. I'm hoping is isn't too hot for the Book Festival in March. I missed you at the Poetry Society meeting this morning. The conference is going to be in Tucson next November. We need your help.

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